RESULTS IN : the latest V.C.C. 1924/5 trade cards to sell, in John Fitzhugh’s sale, today, made up to £195 each, as last time. There was a QPR card for £195 (same player but slightly different to mine, shown here) a Fulham, for a little less, and a Hartlepool card too, also at £195… c.£200 for a Hartlepool card a ‘Pool collectors’ record? I noted the QPR V.C.C. card John sold was numbered ‘20’, whereas mine is not numbered - see pic here - it has no number, suggesting either a rare type or a mis-print. Alas for the crease but at half the price the other one sold for today, in the 30 July John FItzhugh Sporting Collectibles auction, it’s a steal! More news on John’s next auction when we have the details… SHOWING HERE are 3 other cards, a similar QPR card, a Stockport County card and a related issue, of a Huddersfield Town player by Poppletons! All these are available (but not for long) on www.rarecards.co.uk

SECRETS of EBAY that Ebay does NOT want you to know… #1: if you “WATCH” an item you plan to buy, you are merely helping your competitors steal it from you, or drive up the price, as Ebay rely on “watches” to know what’s hot, so they can send out messages to others who are searching similar things - this is why you see “what others are watching” and, if you pay privately, why you get those messages detailing what others are doing. DO NOT “WATCH” items - remember them instead. Put a date on your phone organiser, in your calendar, your diary or whatever, and come on-line at the time of the sale to ensure you get it - and for a steal. Some BID-SNIPING organisations ALSO sell info - back to Ebay! It gets worse. Bidding, especially bidding too early, only helps Ebay advertise your bidding to others. Further, anyone on Ebay - who knows how - can actually see what you are bidding on. It’s a way for lazy sods to find the right stuff. Track a buyer who you know does the hard work, then keep your eye on his bids to find the good stuff by pouncing at the end of the sale. I know people who just watch other people, who don’t bother searching for themselves, and they do really well off it, so they say. I can believe it. i have often heard friends say, “it was like they knew what I was bidding on…” (they did), or “… how did they find the same item; it was obscure, in the wrong category and the spelling of the player’s name was wrong; it could not have been found by chance!” (it wasn’t - they followed you) To compound matters, Ebay also shares your bidding activity with other punters, - with competing bidders. Bidding too early, like watching, just allows Ebay to gather and share the info, which results in more bidders, which equals = higher prices on things you want; and it probably guarantees someone else will pip you at the post on the item you really want. Don’t “watch”, don’t bid too early, and don’t use certain auction snipers if you want to keep the price down - those Ebay algorithms that ‘attract’ multiple automatic bidders at the last minute, to drive-up “snipes” … they are ‘astonishing’ (I could use less kind phraseology)

SECRETS of EBAY that Ebay does NOT want you to know… #1: if you “WATCH” an item you plan to buy, you are merely helping your competitors steal it from you, or drive up the price, as Ebay rely on “watches” to know what’s hot, so they can send out messages to others who are searching similar things - this is why you see “what others are watching” and, if you pay privately, why you get those messages detailing what others are doing. DO NOT “WATCH” items - remember them instead. Put a date on your phone organiser, in your calendar, your diary or whatever, and come on-line at the time of the sale to ensure you get it - and for a steal. Some BID-SNIPING organisations ALSO sell info - back to Ebay! It gets worse. Bidding, especially bidding too early, only helps Ebay advertise your bidding to others. Further, anyone on Ebay - who knows how - can actually see what you are bidding on. It’s a way for lazy sods to find the right stuff. Track a buyer who you know does the hard work, then keep your eye on his bids to find the good stuff by pouncing at the end of the sale. I know people who just watch other people, who don’t bother searching for themselves, and they do really well off it, so they say. I can believe it. i have often heard friends say, “it was like they knew what I was bidding on…” (they did), or “… how did they find the same item; it was obscure, in the wrong category and the spelling of the player’s name was wrong; it could not have been found by chance!” (it wasn’t - they followed you) To compound matters, Ebay also shares your bidding activity with other punters, - with competing bidders. Bidding too early, like watching, just allows Ebay to gather and share the info, which results in more bidders, which equals = higher prices on things you want; and it probably guarantees someone else will pip you at the post on the item you really want. Don’t “watch”, don’t bid too early, and don’t use certain auction snipers if you want to keep the price down - those Ebay algorithms that ‘attract’ multiple automatic bidders at the last minute, to drive-up “snipes” … they are ‘astonishing’ (I could use less kind phraseology)

Now if you were to believe a certain cards ‘valuer’ you’d think these were worth about $5 each. Ridiculous. The ‘valuer’, who will remain un-named & un-shamed, lists them not only under a wrong issuer, but under-values them by about 50 times their real value. Issued ONLY in Chile, ONLY with a weekly magazine, ONLY during the run-up to the World Cup in 1962, these cards (yes, they are cards, not stickers) were issued 4 to a card, almost postcard-sized, to be cut into singles. Concurrently there was a stickers issue. The stickers were issued with bubble gum, DOS EN UNO, and they were issued by LQL, in Santiago, Chile. Value for the cards? John Allen had a few, and only 1 other collector I know has any - 1. The stickers seem to have got around a bit easier but I am offering £20 for each sticker and £50 for each card you don’t want. I do not expect any answers, nor replies to this sincere offer. If you see the cards for less than £100 - bargain; the stickers for less than £50 likewise. www.rarecards.co.uk

Very rare GENTE stickers album from Italy, 1970, and the original magazine it came with. Like the Epoch and Radio Courier collections of the same era these stickers were cut from pages in the magazine - so many each and every week - and then glued-down into this album. Here’s the England line-up. If you find the individual stickers expect to pay £25 each - or more!

British football on gum cards from Spain 1948, by Tabay, showing album cover and pages including small gum cards of QPR v DERBY Co and ARSENAL v PRESTON NE not to mention the numerous Spanish items. A clever concept, the album marked sporting achievements in 1948 and a page was issued every month, and the cards for that page were available in gum during a certain period and not for very long. A very difficult series to complete. The cards are known with 2 different types of backs, one with a simple green packet of gum and the other with wording aside the gum packet.

When football cards were also beautiful!  Well, I for one would rather look at pussy (cats) than see the often characterless, ovunque dappertutto (can’t remember the English word!) ugly stars of today’s millionaires-only game - no matter how much I respect their skills down there … I mean ON THE BALL down there, at the feet. No matter how loyal I am to a team, I HATE adverts on shirts, and if you wear an advert, advertising (helping make money) for a company or a firm without being paid to use your own body to show off their brand in that way, you are being used, geezah! Just think : today it’s become normalized for punters on the street, regular poor people to actually pay someone so they can advertise - for free - to help enrich already wealthy corporations using the only thing that’s sacrosanct - their own bodies. And they go on about selling bodies for sex. At least that pays - and sometimes pleasures. Wearing advertising for free is NUTS! They’re laughing at you, from up there, those PR managers and ad gurus the corporations pay to make it seem ‘normal’ to wear ads on your own body

When football cards were also beautiful! Well, I for one would rather look at pussy (cats) than see the often characterless, ovunque dappertutto (can’t remember the English word!) ugly stars of today’s millionaires-only game - no matter how much I respect their skills down there … I mean ON THE BALL down there, at the feet. No matter how loyal I am to a team, I HATE adverts on shirts, and if you wear an advert, advertising (helping make money) for a company or a firm without being paid to use your own body to show off their brand in that way, you are being used, geezah! Just think : today it’s become normalized for punters on the street, regular poor people to actually pay someone so they can advertise - for free - to help enrich already wealthy corporations using the only thing that’s sacrosanct - their own bodies. And they go on about selling bodies for sex. At least that pays - and sometimes pleasures. Wearing advertising for free is NUTS! They’re laughing at you, from up there, those PR managers and ad gurus the corporations pay to make it seem ‘normal’ to wear ads on your own body

1910 trade card of a Man Utd player … now on at £250.00 - and that’s not too high a price, even if this card is barely above poor! This series is SOOOOOOOOOOOO RARE, and being the Man U card from the set, premium. Were this card excellent, or even very good - though it’d be nigh-on impossible after 100+ years - it’d be at 1,000